Paintings

Description of the painting Pablo Picasso “Harlequin and his girlfriend”


A characteristic feature of the work of Pablo Picasso, at the beginning of the last century, was pessimism. The artist was not left with heavy philosophical thoughts about the meaning of his own existence, about the attitude of the audience to his works and about his place in the history of world painting. All these sad thoughts were reflected in the works of Picasso, executed in that period of life that was creative for him.

Picasso often visited Parisian cafes. Such places were known as exchanges where artists, mimes and acrobats could sometimes find an employer.

The canvas depicts artists sitting at a table in a similar institution. The harlequin's gaze expresses attention mixed with impatience. In the hope that today he will be able to find at least some work, he peers at the cafe visitors. He is very tense, this is evidenced by the fact that he bites his nails on one hand, and the second tugs at his ear.

Looking at his girlfriend, it becomes clear that the girl in deep thoughtfulness absent-mindedly sorting out her thoughts. With an absent gaze and a sad expression on her face, she does not try to amuse herself with any hopes.

Both young men are exhausted by the hard life that befell the wandering artists. The viewer is conveyed their mood and sympathy for their difficult fate.

The author’s idea is to describe in this picture not only a creative union, but also to emphasize the difference in views on life between a man and a woman. The man here is depicted as energetic, ready to find a way to earn a living. A woman lays care of herself on her companion, and she prefers to remain in a passive dreamy state.

The dominant presence in the composition of blue adds to the mood of sadness and slight apathy. The author decided to dilute the color scheme with red tones, symbolizing hope and desire to achieve more successful times.





Plastov Pictures Photo With Titles


Watch the video: Girl Before a Mirror by Pablo Picasso, 1932. MoMA Education (October 2021).