Paintings

Description of the painting Giorgione "Laura"


This portrait of a beautiful stranger was painted a very long time ago, in the 16th century. If you compare its size with other famous canvases of those times, you can see that it was quite small. That length, that the width of the canvas did not reach even half a meter. He was drawn with oil. And now let’s put aside the technical side of the picture and go directly to the content and composition of this canvas.

When we see such black and white transitions, we immediately associate them with the Leonardo sphumato. It really was something similar, because in Leonardo we see a similar color and softening of the midtones. In general, if you study the work of these two great artists, then you can not do without comparison.

They interestingly solved the problem of depicting transitions in a picture from soft to sharper and harder. It is this technique that we can see on this canvas. This kind of enlivens the picture, instills in it a sense of movement, breathing. When you look at the canvas, it seems so real that there is no doubt that the viewer is somewhere in the picture itself as a secret observer. With the help of soft overflows, Giordano was able to depict all the fullness and softness of the female body.

In this image, some prosaism can be traced, but still the girl is beautiful, despite the simplicity. She is depicted on a black background, which contrasts as much as possible with her fair skin and sets off the severity of facial expressions. The girl’s head is covered with a scarf, which carelessly falls on her chest, enveloping the camp of a young beauty like a snake. Her outfit is quite contrary to the flowering and riot of greenery behind her back. She is wearing a red fur coat. But what can clothes mean when we have such a controversial image of the face itself? These stubborn eyes, a focused look, thin pursed lips ... How is the girl so offended, or perhaps hardened by fate?





Monument to the Lefthander


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